The Brookline Journal
1952

The Year In Review

(From The Pages Of The Brookline Journal)

Browse Through The Weekly 1952 Brookline Journals

<><><><> <><><><> <><><><> <><><><> <><><><> <><><><>

On January 8, 1952, the community of Brookline celebrated it's 44th year as one of the many neighborhoods that make up the City of Pittsburgh. While the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette and Press covered the news throughout the city, residents here in Brookline also had the Brookline Journal, a member of the Western Pennsylvania Weekly Newspaper Association. The neighborhood publication highlighted local community events and happenings throughout Brookline.

The Brookline Journal's publisher was Lloyd Green. The managing editor was Guilbert Aubenque and the office manager was Rosemary Imhoff. Each year the newspaper was increasing in both advertising revenue and subscriptions. It was growing along with the fast-expanding community, and there was plenty of news to cover. The yearly subscription rate was $1.50. Individual editions were three cents apiece and classified ads cost four cents per word.

The Brookline Journal was located in an office behind the Paul N. Smith Realty building, next to the Savings and Trust Building. The paper had been operating out of a back room for several years. In 1952, Smith Realty was kind enough to build an addition to the rear of the building which became the new Journal office.

The following text is a short recap of the Year 1952, using information gathered from a quick browsing of the weekly Brookline Journal collection. Afterwards is a complete page by page photo record of the each edition of the journal. They provide quite an interesting, and complete, look back at the neighborhood of Brookline in 1952.

<><><><> <><><><> <><><><> <><><><> <><><><> <><><><>

Neighborhood Comings And Goings

The Brookline Journal covered all facets of the local news, from wedding and birth announcements to the latest in cooking sensations. Church and school gatherings, civic and community happenings, social and sporting events, and much more were captured on a weekly basis as the year progressed.

The paper featured an editorial column, "The Sound and The Fury" by Gil Aubenque, where he discussed some of the main issues confronting the community. Another weekly column, "Our Town" by Rosemary Imhoff, covered the lighter news, like congratulatory, get well and birthday wishes. Information from Harrisburg came in the form of a weekly column by Congressman James Fulton.

The year began with residents and merchants again grumbling about the state of snow removal within the community, and most adamantly about the many merchant sidewalks along the boulevard that were not being properly maintained. Amidst this seemingly yearly state of wintery discontent, life for the average Brookliner went on, each in it's own unique way.

In January, work began on the reconstruction of the Brookline Savings and Trust building. Opened in 1926, the highly successful neighborhood bank had outgrown it's current environment. New plans called for a complete upgrade of the present structure, including the installation of an ultra-modern facade. While customers were inconvenienced during the construction period, a February increase in the savings account interest rate to 2.5 percent went a long way towards quelling dissatisfaction.

Anderson's Radio and Appliance store hosted the "Count Your Lucky Stars" Contest. A Journal advertisement featured a rocket ship leaving a long trail of stars. Entry forms were included on the page. Contestants had to count the stars on the page and mail in the form. The top prize was a $298.45 Stromberg-Carlson console television. When the New Year contest was decided, the winner was George Schrier of Woodbourne Avenue.

Also in January, the Journal posted the first half standings of the Brookline Businessmen's Association Bowling League. The top team at the halfway mark was captained by Baz Nolan. The top individual bowling averages were Tom Smithyman - 161, Morris Grumet - 151, Baz Nolan - 144, Mike Melman - 142, John Pascarosa - 140 and Frank DeBor - 140. Although trailing in average, Mr. DeBor registered the top overall game, rolling a league-best 235.

The year 1952 was a fantastic season for the Resurrection Elementary School boy's and girl's basketball programs. For the first time, the teams were able to play on their own home court. A large meeting hall in the basement of the school building had recently been converted into a gymnasium. The Journal ran weekly updates on the progress of the teams. By the time the season ended in March the Resurrection boys had finished in second place with a 10-5 record.

The girls, on the other hand, won the Catholic Girl's League Championship with a 16-4 victory over St. Mary's of the Mount on March 23. For the ladies, it would be their first in a string of five consecutive Catholic League titles. On the other side of the neighborhood, Brookline Elementary School's boys cagers posted an undefeated 6-0 record in City League play.

In mid-March, the Kiwanis Club, a local organization that sponsors several youth activities throughout the neighborhood, organized a free trip to the Shriner's Circus at the Syria Mosque for 120 lucky Brookline children. It took three buses to transport all of the kids to the event.

Sam's Hardware celebrated it's 16th Anniversary with "Nine Days of Spectacular Bargains" from April 3-12. Customers could buy a forty-two piece dinner set for $3.95, or an electric percolator for $2.69. Bedroom and living room lighting fixtures were marked down to half price.

On April 5, James Prentice of Milan Avenue was installed as the first Korean War Veteran in the ranks of Brookline's American Legion Post#540. It took a policy change within the organization in order to make way for members who had served in America's latest war against aggression, which the government had labeled a "police action."

The coming of Spring saw the farewell of a long-standing boulevard commercial establishment. In April, the Ben Franklin Store held a final clearance sale to liquidate all stock. The building had recently been purchased by the Brookline Savings and Trust Company, located next door.

This acquisition meant that the current bank remodeling plans would have to be adjusted to accomodate the increased floor space. Contractor J.J. McGaffin would merge the two buildings into one large structure. The granite and glass outer facade would be doubled in length and the bank would gain the additional space needed for future expansion.

The popular financial institution reported an overall asset increase of $3,000,000 over the past year alone. With construction nearly finished on the original bank building, the contractor estimated that it would take a bit over a year to complete the entire expanded project. It would be a long year for bank employees and patrons, but the end result would be well worth the wait.

The month of May saw the long-anticipated start of the inaugural Brookline Little League season. While news of the opening weekend's games was the hot item in town, other memorable front page events were the laying of the cornerstone for the expansion of Elizabeth-Seton High School on Pioneer Avenue and the announcement of the annual Memorial Day Parade.

An advertisement that ran around this time showed the new County Airport and touted the benefits that this modern airline terminal would bring to the City of Pittsburgh. The year 1952 was the height of Mayor David Lawrence's Renaissance I building and improvement initiative throughout the city. Pittsburgh was in the process of transforming itself from an aging Rust Belt factory town into a modern 20th Century metropolis.

Much the same could be said for what was happening on a smaller scale within the community of Brookline. There was so much new construction and modernization going on in the neighborhood. This steady series of improvements, both in infrastructure and real estate stock, showed that Brookline was following the lead of its municipal mentor. The community was making changes that would alter the landscape and the quality of life of the citizenry for the next several decades.

The Brookline Apaches sandlot baseball team made their season debut in a Memorial Day exhibition game at the South Park Oval, beating the Colonial Cards. The Apaches played in the South Hills Junior Federation League and went on to have another successful campaign, making an appearance in the post-season playoffs.

The annual Community and School Picnic was held on June 12 at West View Park. Parents and their children flocked to the amusement park for a day of fun and excitement. This was Brookline's reserved day at West View and the park was packed with locals lining up to ride roller coasters like The Dips and the Racing Whippet, or take their chances on the games in the Arcade. Some just meandered along the broad Midway meeting with friends and neighbors. The picnic also featured a free circus act. This was the most-attended social event on the Brookline yearly calendar.

The Independance Day Parade was another major neighborhood happening. This year the parade route began at Queensboro Avenue and led to Moore Park, where a community festival was held. The Brookline Little League All-Stars treated spectators to a fine exhibition game, and the all-day excitement was topped off by a fireworks display that evening.

The month of July came to a close with the annual Kiwanis Club Water Carnival at Moore Park Pool. Winners of the various events included William Yot, Mary Louise Cueddyre, Cynthia Agnew, Buddy Norton, Dick Kinevy, Denna Beckert, Billy Russell and Marcia Bradley. Another event that commenced on that final day of the month was the weekend Indoor Garden Party at Elizabeth Seton High School, a fund raising gala to help defer cost of their new building project.

As the summer drew to a close, the Resurrection football team geared up for another season. In the home opener at Moore Park, the Raiders defeated St. Phillip's by the score of 20-6. In other local gridiron action, the Brookline Eagles, a 20-Under team that competed in the Pittsburgh Metropolitan League, also began their season in September.


The 1952 Resurrection Raiders Catholic League football team.

One notable omission in the Journal's summer reporting that should be mentioned in this yearly review is the July 12 closing of the Warner Brothers Boulevard Theatre. First opened on November 10, 1937, this traditional movie house, with a lower level bowling alley, brought much joy, laughter and entertainment to Brookliners for nearly fifteen years. The final presentation was a double feature showing the Abbott and Costello hits "Noose Hangs High" and "Africa Screams." This information was obtained from the Pittsburgh Press.

The Journal did report that the theatre building was purchased by the Cedars of Lebanon Lodge for use as a social club for members. In October, there arose much concern among Brookline community groups as to the transfer of a liquor license from the lodge's previous location. Twenty-one local organizations united in an attempt to block any issuance of a license to the new owners.

On October 9, one of Brookline's most senior residents passed away. James Dooley moved to Brookline in 1900, and in 1907 opened a meat market at 704 Brookline Boulevard. It was one of the first commercial establishments ever built along the boulevard, and was highlighted in the October 13, 1907 edition of the Brookline Herald. After Dooley retired from the butcher business, he became Director of the Brookline Building and Loan Association. Until his death, James Dooley maintained his home above the old meat market on Brookline Boulevard.

The annual Halloween Parade was held on October 31. Hundreds of kids showed up for what organizers called the best Halloween Parade ever. The boulevard was alive with activity from 7pm until well after 9pm. Judges awarded twenty-three cash prizes. In first place was Daniel and Charles Waner of Starkamp Avenue, costumed as Captain Video and the Video Ranger.

The fall months also saw a number of political advertisements by both the Republicans and Democrats. General Dwight Eisenhower and his running mate Richard Nixon were campaigning against Adlai Stevenson for the presidency. Ads for Ike and Dick highlighted their tough stance against the growing Communist menace. When the voting ended on Election Day, November 4, Eisenhower was selected to follow Harry Truman as the 34th President of the United States.

In November, the national Red Feather Drive was launched. The fund-raiser supported ninety-two health, welfare and recreational programs. Here in Brookline, the Community Chest quota set by organizers was $2408. Local residents once again showed their generosity. When the overall tally was counted, Brookline had surplassed its goal and contributed $2451.

As thoughts turned to the holiday season in December, two Brookline Boy Scouts, George Roth and John Stewart of Troop#206 from the Paul Presbyterian Church, celebrated their having achieved the rank of Eagle. The final Brookline Journal edition of the year was circulated on Christmas Day. The front page showed scores of children meeting with Santa Claus at the annual Kiwanis Club Christmas Party.

<><><><> <><><><> <><><><> <><><><> <><><><> <><><><>

Churches and Schools

In 1952, the community of Brookline was served by a number of churches. Depending upon an individual's religious preference, one could attend the Roman Catholic Church of the Resurrection, the Brookline Boulevard United Presbyterian Church, the Grace Evangelical Lutheran Church, St. Mark Evangelical Lutheran Church, the Brookline Methodist Church, the Episcopal Church of the Advent, the Paul Presbyterian Church or the Maronite Our Lady of Victory Church.

The Journal contained weekly listings of Mass services and activities at the various churches. There were also community-sponsored ads encouraging readers to attend the church of their choice. These parishes, and the priests that served, played a integral role in the daily lives of their congregation, and the Journal documented many notable events.

Another church-related activity that got a lot of attention in the weekly pages were betrothals and marriage announcements. There were plenty of weddings taking place in the community, and the Journal published a picture and short blurb on the vast majority of them.

Expansion was another subject that was high on the wish list for most parishes. Brookline's growing population meant that most churches needed more space to properly fill the educational and spiritual needs of their congregation. In June, the Brookline Boulevard United Presbyterian Church announced that they had approved plans for a $175,000 expansion to the existing sanctuary. The new Religious Education Building would make a stunning addition to the historic Brookline church.

Brookline had several elementary schools to cater to the educational needs of the neighborhood children. For a parochial education, students could attend Resurrection Elementary. Public schools were Brookline Elementary, West Liberty Elementary and Carmalt Elementary. For a secondary education, students attended South Hills High School in Mount Washington. Catholic ladies could attend Elizabeth-Seton High School.

Brookline, West Liberty, Resurrection and Elizabeth-Seton each submitted regular news bits for publication. These focused on both scholastic and athletic achievements. Honor roll lists were common at the end of semesters, and exceptional students were highlighted. Marilyn Sieber from Elizabeth-Seton High School and Nicholas Vasilopoulos of South Hills High were both awarded a four-year scholarships for academic excellence. Graduates Joseph Irr of Oakridge Street and Don Sayenga of Berwin Avenue both received appointments to West Point.

Another major activity in the lives of Brookline children was scouting. Each church or school seemed to have one of more scouting groups meeting in their halls. Some of the groups identified in the Journal record are Girl Scout Troops #518, #6, #419 and #564. Brownie Troops were #678 and #537. Boy Scouts were #206, #6 and #240. Cub Scout Packs were #106 and #40. The Journal covered several scouting functions throughout the year.

Another big part of the education of local children, and adults, was the part played by the Brookline Branch of the Carnegie Library, located along Brookline Boulevard. New book listings were published almost weekly, along with other library events.

<><><><> <><><><> <><><><> <><><><> <><><><> <><><><>

Traffic Safety A Top Priority

Problems with vehicle and pedestrian traffic along Brookline Boulevard, and the side streets adjoining the main road, had been a problem for several years. Brookline's population was growing steadily every year. Most families now owned a car. This caused a dramatic increase in vehicluar traffic. Brookline was also a walking community, and with the growth in population came a corresponding leap in the number of people strolling the sidewalks and crossing at intersections. This problem was magnified along Brookline Boulevard.

Debates had been raging among community groups, such as the Brookline Businessmen's Association and the Joint Civic Committee, about how to deal with this worsening safety issue. These groups, however, were closed to the general public. In an effort to give a voice to the average Brookliner, the Brookline Journal in March proposed the idea of creating a Community Council that would consist of members of the existing organizations along with local residents to give more weight to community issues when dealing with the city officials.

While initiatives like additional parking meters, traffic lights and stop signs along Brookline Boulevard, better traffic safety measures near the local schools, and reconstruction of the lower East Brookline section of the boulevard were being tossed about behind closed doors, an accident occurred that spurred emotions and led to the city finally taking action.

On June 5, Mrs. Anna DeBor, 65-year old mother of local resident and businessman Frank DeBor, was hit by an automobile while attempting to cross the boulevard along the 900 block. Mrs. DeBor suffered a number of injuries and was briefly hospitalized. Community outrage soared as a result due to the lack of vehicle restrictions along the boulevard.


A view along Breining Street looking towards Carmalt Elementary.

Soon residents were complaining about other roadways around the neighborhood that were sorely in need of repair. A photo of Breining Street made the front page. It appeared as a narrow two-lane gravel road with a steep slope to one side and no sidewalk on the other. Yet, despite the dangerous conditions on this busy street, a large number of children walked this route every day to Carmalt Elementary School and the Brookline Memorial Community Center Park.

Another vehicle/pedestrian accident along the boulevard a few weeks later, and the ensuing backlash, prompted City Council to finally take steps to address the matter. After some discussion, it was decided to place traffic signals at Glenarm and Flatbush Avenues. Additional stop signs would be placed at Chelton and Queensboro Avenues.

No parking signs would be installed along congested side streets like Wedgemere, Stebbins and Castlegate to relieve congestion. Furthermore, on-street parking was eliminated during a 60-day trial period along portions of roads like Dunster, Crysler and Hartranft Streets near West Liberty School, and along Woodbourne, Castlegate and Fordham Avenues near Brookline School. The city also pledged to look into other issues, like the condition of Breining Street, which would require a more drastic reconstruction effort.


City worker put No Parking sign along Wedgemere Avenue.

Another traffic initiative that was shelved by City Planners, although being widely accepted throughout the community, was a proposal to extend Chelton Avenue from Hobson to McNeilly Road. The project would include the complete repaving of nearby sections of Berkshire, Hobson and Woodbourne. In their decision to reject the proposal, officials cited the high cost and the extensive regrading of the hillside necessary to build the Chelton extension. The associated paving of the nearby streets would, however, proceed as planned when funding became available.

<><><><> <><><><> <><><><> <><><><> <><><><> <><><><>

The Boulevard Commercial District

From the birth of the community of Brookline in 1908, the Boulevard Commercial District emerged as a place where residents could satisfy the majority of their medical, shopping or service needs without ever having to leave the neighborhood. Shoppers could hop on either the 39-Brookline trolley or ride on the Brookline Bus to get from one end of the long shopping district to the other.

There were several stores that offered meats, poultry and other foodstuffs. Grumet's Cash Market, Melman's Super Market, Dattilo's Market, Klose's Meat Market, Neuser's Market and Sunny Farms Poultry Market/Delicatessen made grocery shopping on Brookline Boulevard a common practice among the citizenry.

For breads, cakes, donuts and cookies one could visit Blue Bonnet Bakery, Herold's Bakery or Kribel's Bakery. Bard's Ice Cream Store offered several tasty treats and a half gallon of ice cream could be bought for just 99 cents. If looking for a night out for dinner, Joe Zitelli's Boulevard Gardens, Denmark's Cafe, Joe's Tavern, Bea's Italian Kitchen or H&R Dairy Mart offered a variety of sandwiches and prepared meals.

Clothing needs were satisfied by The Betty Shop for women, The Kiddie Shop for children and the Boulevard Men's Shop. To keep the garments looking like new, the Brookline Pressing Company, Quaill's Cleaners, Eastbrook Cleaners and Ruby's Cleaning Service were all available along the boulevard. For casual washing needs, the Brookline Half Hour Laundry had all the equipment necessary for the do-it-yourselfer.

Pharmaceutical needs were filled at a number of boulevard locations. East Brookline Pharmacy, Stebbrook Pharmacy, Charlson's Drug Store and Brookline Pharmacy were established businesses. In February, Sunset Pharmacy opened a new location along the boulevard. For the purchase of soda pop or beer, Walsh Beer Distributor and Edward Coennen Distributor were the place to go.

Hardware stores that ran regular ads in the Journal were Jay's East Brookline Hardware, Bryant's Hardware and Sam's Hardware. For plumbing problems one could call on Fred Doerzbacher Plumbing, The Brookline Plumber or South Hills Plumbing, all with offices located along the boulevard.

Televisions, furniture, electronics and more could be purchased at a number of appliance stores. Anderson Radio and Appliance, Brookline Appliance Store and the Vogue Appliance Store all had great deals on the latest in home furnishings accessories and electronics. In June, Santoro Electric opened up shop on the boulevard. Santoro specialized in radios, televisions, vinyl records and electric motor repair.

Realty and financial needs could be satisfied at a number of boulevard institutions. The main financial player in town was the Brookline Savings and Trust Company. Others who specialized more in the strong real estate market were the Pioneer Finance Company, Ebenshire Realty Company and Paul N. Smith Realty. W. Sausser's Brookline Realty joined the crowd in January, opening an office at 1320 Brookline Boulevard.

Myer's Service Station was still the most popular fueling depot in the neighborhood. The shop at the corner of Pioneer and the boulevard also offered the latest in Goodyear tires and batteries. Al Bachner Auto Repair was a local favorite for vehicle repair and maintenance.

Other businesses located along the boulevard that advertised in the Brookline Journal were Edwin Meyer DDS, Warrington 5 and 10 Cent Store, Vic's Toy and Novelty Store, Ritz Beauty Shop, Fickley Photography, Premier Photo Company, South Hills Sports Center, Brookline Jewelry, DeBor Funeral Home, Sal's Barber Shop and J.J. McGaffin Alterations and Repairs.

Other Brookline service businesses not headquartered along the main street that ran frequent ads were Jay Helferty and Son Moving, George Donaher Interior Painting, K.R. Emerick Painting, Joseph Yoest Painting and Decorating, George Haffner - Electrician, H.N. Hill Awnings and Venetian Blinds, R.C. Weitershausen - Fuller Brush, H. Rosch and C. Meller Antenae Repair and Installation, G&G Atlantic Service Station, Metz Plumbing, Angelo Coco - Insurance, Dan Dougherty - Insurance, Pat Hogan - Insurance, The Flower Garden, Brookline Greenhouses, Auto Row Battery Shop and Downtown Motors, where a customer could purchase the new 1952 Pontiac with spectacular dual-range performance.

Dormont merchants also ran large ads in the Brookline Journal. Some of these were Robert Hensel Commercial Printing, Uhl Jewelers, Coury Television, Potomac Furniture and Tritsch's Shoe Store.

<><><><> <><><><> <><><><> <><><><> <><><><> <><><><>

BBMA Little League Baseball

One of the highlights of the year was the Brookline Businessman's Associaton bringing Little League baseball to Brookline for the first time. For the past several years, the only organized ball club in the neighborhood was the Brookline Apaches, an age 18-Under sandlot team.

Under the leadership of Morris Grumet and John Pascarosa, a campaign was begun back in 1951 to form a local Little League program. Brookline was following the lead of several other communities around the city that were joining the national Williamsport baseball organization.

In February, the BBMA Little League Association was formed. Board members included Morris Grumet, president; John Pascarosa, secretary; Eugene Means, treasurer; Jack Ashworth, field representative; Cliff Waterson, player agent and Dave Frick, head umpire.

A campaign was immediately begun to raise funds for the program. The organization needed to purchase bats, balls, uniforms and other equipment. Use of the ballfield at the Brookline Community Center had been secured, but there was much work needed to get the field up to standards. This including the installation of bleachers. To offset these costs, Brookline residents were asked to each mail in a one dollar donation. The community response was overwhelmingly positive.

Tryouts were held in April to fill the roster positions of four teams with fifteen players each. Over 100 children showed up to vie for the lucky sixty spots. The coaches of the four teams were: Dutch Wertz, Red Mangan and Bud Auen - Ebenshire Village; Tony Kazinsky and Joe Power - American Legion Post#540; Cliff Valentine, Mike O'Neill and Ed Mathias - Community Center; and Henry Hofbauer - Kiwanis Club.

After a month of practice and preparation, the Journal reported that the inaugural games were set to begin on May 27. Opening Day festivities included a parade down Brookline Boulevard. County Commissioner John Kane was on hand to throw out the first pitch.

The Journal covered these events in detail. The May 22 edition showed pictures of the four teams, league officials and a map showing the location of the Community Center field. Little League rules were printed, along with an editorial trumpeting the ideals and objectives of the program. An ad by Frank DeBor hailed "Three Cheers For Little League Baseball. Let's Play Ball!"

Week by week from June through August, the Journal kept tabs on the progress of the season. At the halfway mark, the Ebenshire Village team held a one-game lead over Community Center. Kiwanis Club, then in third place, came on strong at the end of the campaign and finished at the top of the standings with a 12-6 record to capture the first Brookline Little League title.

Brookline's All-Star team faired well, defeating Carrick in their first game before bowing out to Brentwood, 8-2, in the second round. Overall, the first BBMA Little League season was a rousing success. With so much enthusiasm among the parents and children of the community, directors vowed to do their best to expand the program to include more kids.

The first Little League season officially came to a close in October with a banquet at the Brookline Methodist Church. Trophies were handed out to the winners, and special awards were given to deserving players. Dennis Mangan of Kiwanis was given the top pitcher award after posting an 8-3 slate. Ray Auen of Kiwanis received the top hitter award for batting 22-for-53 and a chart-topping .415 average. Jim Nagy of Ebenshire Village was named the league's Most Valuable Player, and Jack Lammert of Community Center earned the Sportsmanship Award.

<><><><> <><><><> <><><><> <><><><> <><><><> <><><><>

The Korean War

While the community of Brookline grew and prospered, many of the neighborhood's young adults were actively serving in the United States military. A number of these soldiers, airmen and sailors were deployed in the Pacific Theatre, fighting as members of the United Nations Police Action on the Korean Peninsula, better known as the Korean War.

The war, which began in November 1950, had settled into a virtual stalemate along the 38th Parallel. While protracted peace negotiations were in progress, the United Nations and Communist Forces were still engaging in fierce, bloody battles. These focused mostly on strategic ridge lines.

Some of the main engagements during 1952 were the Battle of Hill Eerie (March 21 June 21), the Battle of Old Baldy (June 26 August 4), the Battle of White Horse (October 6 15) and the Battle of Triangle Hill (October 14 November 25). Many of Brookline's soldiers saw action either on the front lines or in support positions. A good number of Brookline sailors were involved in the United Nations blockade or in naval fire support missions near the coasts.

Although the war had taken the lives of four Brookline soldiers during the previous year, 1952 saw no increase in the death toll, despite the number of local soldiers deployed to the Korean war zone. The Journal often published short notes detailing the status of Brookline's Korean War veterans.

Among those mentioned were Marines Edward Weber and Robert Devin, both residents of Brookline Boulevard, Robert Bowman of Woodward Avenue and Edwin Joyce of Capital Avenue. Naval veterans included Edmund Hunsicker of Oakridge Street, Bert Black of Bellaire Avenue, Roman Pawlowski of Greencrest Drive, Kenneth Manko of Mayville Avenue and Theodore Goebeler of Woodward Avenue. Naval aviator Bert Black was a gunner on a PB4Y aircraft with forty-three combat missions.

Army veterans included Ohner Cramer of Parkview Avenue, twin brothers Robert and Norman Nickolay, George Saxton of Berkshire Avenue, Donald Bauer and Miles Clark of Fordham Avenue, Richard Walther of Bellaire Avenue and Frank Mazza of Alwyn Street.

Fighting on the Korean front would continue until the armistice was signed on July 23, 1953. It was one chapter in the broader Cold War conflict between the United States and the Soviet Union.

With regards to the Cold War, on October 6, Captain Arthur Staniland, a jet fighter pilot with the 66th Fighter Interceptor Squadron stationed at Elmendorf Air Force Base in Alaska, was lost at sea when his aircraft went down while on patrol over the Arctic Ocean. Staniland was married to the former Alice Davis of McNeilly Avenue. The couple had two daughters. After Arthur's loss, Alice and the girls moved back to the family home in Brookline.

Two features that appeared in most editions of the Journal were a short comic bit by Vic Vet, who dispenced advise to veterans on such issues as GI Loans and Insurance, and the Veteran's Q&A, which offered answers to many questions about veteran's benefits.


Brookline Journal - January 5, 1952

January 4, 1952

Page 1    Page 2
Page 3    Page 4
Page 5    Page 6
Page 7    Page 8

Brookline Journal - January 11, 1952

January 10, 1952

Page 1    Page 2
Page 3    Page 4
Page 5    Page 6
Page 7    Page 8

Brookline Journal - January 18, 1952

January 17, 1952

Page 1    Page 2
Page 3    Page 4
Page 5    Page 6
Page 7    Page 8


Brookline Journal - January 25, 1952

January 24, 1952

Page 1    Page 2
Page 3    Page 4
Page 5    Page 6
Page 7    Page 8

Brookline Journal - February 1, 1952

January 31, 1952

Page 1    Page 2
Page 3    Page 4
Page 5    Page 6
Page 7    Page 8

Brookline Journal - February 8, 1952

February 7, 1952

Page 1    Page 2
Page 3    Page 4
Page 5    Page 6
Page 7    Page 8


Brookline Journal - February 15, 1952

February 14, 1952

Page 1    Page 2
Page 3    Page 4
Page 5    Page 6
Page 7    Page 8

Brookline Journal - February 22, 1952

February 21, 1952

Page 1    Page 2
Page 3    Page 4
Page 5    Page 6
Page 7    Page 8

Brookline Journal - March 1, 1952

Febraury 28, 1952

Page 1    Page 2
Page 3    Page 4
Page 5    Page 6
Page 7    Page 8


Brookline Journal - March 8, 1952

March 6, 1952

Page 1    Page 2
Page 3    Page 4
Page 5    Page 6
Page 7    Page 8

Brookline Journal - March 15, 1952

March 13, 1952

Page 1    Page 2
Page 3    Page 4
Page 5    Page 6
Page 7    Page 8

Brookline Journal - March 22, 1952

March 20, 1952

Page 1    Page 2
Page 3    Page 4
Page 5    Page 6
Page 7    Page 8


Brookline Journal - March 29, 1952

March 27, 1952

Page 1    Page 2
Page 3    Page 4
Page 5    Page 6
Page 7    Page 8

Brookline Journal - April 5, 1952

April 3, 1952

Page 1    Page 2
Page 3    Page 4
Page 5    Page 6
Page 7    Page 8
Page 9    Page 10
Page 11    Page 12

Brookline Journal - April 12, 1952

April 10, 1952

Page 1    Page 2
Page 3    Page 4
Page 5    Page 6
Page 7    Page 8
Page 9    Page 10
Page 11    Page 12


Brookline Journal - April 19, 1952

April 24, 1952

Page 1    Page 2
Page 3    Page 4
Page 5    Page 6
Page 7    Page 8

Brookline Journal - April 26, 1952

May 1, 1952

Page 1    Page 2
Page 3    Page 4
Page 5    Page 6
Page 7    Page 8

Brookline Journal - May 3, 1952

May 15, 1952

Page 1    Page 2
Page 3    Page 4
Page 5    Page 6
Page 7    Page 8


Brookline Journal - May 10, 1952

May 22, 1952

Page 1    Page 2
Page 3    Page 4
Page 5    Page 6
Page 7    Page 8
Page 9    Page 10
Page 11    Page 12

Brookline Journal - May 17, 1952

May 29, 1952

Page 1    Page 2
Page 3    Page 4
Page 5    Page 6
Page 7    Page 8

Brookline Journal - May 24, 1952

June 5, 1952

Page 1    Page 2
Page 3    Page 4
Page 5    Page 6
Page 7    Page 8


Brookline Journal - June 1, 1952

June 12, 1952

Page 1    Page 2
Page 3    Page 4
Page 5    Page 6
Page 7    Page 8

Brookline Journal - June 7, 1952

June 19, 1952

Page 1    Page 2
Page 3    Page 4
Page 5    Page 6
Page 7    Page 8

Brookline Journal - June 14, 1952

June 26, 1952

Page 1    Page 2
Page 3    Page 4
Page 5    Page 6
Page 7    Page 8


Brookline Journal - June 21, 1952

July 2, 1952

Page 1    Page 2
Page 3    Page 4
Page 5    Page 6
Page 7    Page 8

Brookline Journal - June 28, 1952

June 10, 1952

Page 1    Page 2
Page 3    Page 4
Page 5    Page 6
Page 7    Page 8

Brookline Journal - July 19, 1952

July 17, 1952

Page 1    Page 2
Page 3    Page 4
Page 5    Page 6
Page 7    Page 8


Brookline Journal - July 26, 1952

July 24, 1952

Page 1    Page 2
Page 3    Page 4
Page 5    Page 6
Page 7    Page 8

Brookline Journal - August 2, 1952

July 31, 1952

Page 1    Page 2
Page 3    Page 4
Page 5    Page 6
Page 7    Page 8

Brookline Journal - August 9, 1952

August 7, 1952

Page 1    Page 2
Page 3    Page 4
Page 5    Page 6
Page 7    Page 8


Brookline Journal - August 16, 1952

August 14, 1952

Page 1    Page 2
Page 3    Page 4
Page 5    Page 6
Page 7    Page 8

Brookline Journal - August 23, 1952

August 21, 1952

Page 1    Page 2
Page 3    Page 4
Page 5    Page 6
Page 7    Page 8

Brookline Journal - August 30, 1952

August 28, 1952

Page 1    Page 2
Page 3    Page 4
Page 5    Page 6
Page 7    Page 8


Brookline Journal - September 6, 1952

September 4, 1952

Page 1    Page 2
Page 3    Page 4
Page 5    Page 6
Page 7    Page 8

Brookline Journal - September 13, 1952

September 11, 1952

Page 1    Page 2
Page 3    Page 4
Page 5    Page 6
Page 7    Page 8

Brookline Journal - September 20, 1952

September 18, 1952

Page 1    Page 2
Page 3    Page 4
Page 5    Page 6


Brookline Journal - October 4, 1952

September 25, 1952

Page 1    Page 2
Page 3    Page 4
Page 5    Page 6
Page 7    Page 8

Brookline Journal - October 11, 1952

October 2, 1952

Page 1    Page 2
Page 3    Page 4
Page 5    Page 6
Page 7    Page 8

Brookline Journal - October 18, 1952

October 9, 1952

Page 1    Page 2
Page 3    Page 4
Page 5    Page 6
Page 7    Page 8


Brookline Journal - October 25, 1952

October 16, 1952

Page 1    Page 2
Page 3    Page 4
Page 5    Page 6
Page 7    Page 8

Brookline Journal - November 1, 1952

October 23, 1952

Page 1    Page 2
Page 3    Page 4
Page 5    Page 6
Page 7    Page 8

Brookline Journal - November 8, 1952

October 30, 1952

Page 1    Page 2
Page 3    Page 4
Page 5    Page 6
Page 7    Page 8


Brookline Journal - November 15, 1952

November 6, 1952

Page 1    Page 2
Page 3    Page 4
Page 5    Page 6
Page 7    Page 8

Brookline Journal - November 23, 1952

November 13, 1952

Page 1    Page 2
Page 3    Page 4
Page 5    Page 6
Page 7    Page 8

Brookline Journal - November 29, 1952

November 20, 1952

Page 1    Page 2
Page 3    Page 4
Page 5    Page 6
Page 7    Page 8


Brookline Journal - December 6, 1952

November 28, 1952

Page 1    Page 2
Page 3    Page 4
Page 5    Page 6
Page 7    Page 8

Brookline Journal - December 13, 1952

December 4, 1952

Page 1    Page 2
Page 3    Page 4
Page 5    Page 6
Page 7    Page 8

Brookline Journal - December 20, 1952

December 11, 1952

Page 1    Page 2
Page 3    Page 4
Page 5    Page 6
Page 7    Page 8
Page 9    Page 10
Page 11    Page 12


 

Brookline Journal - December 28, 1952

December 25, 1952

Page 1    Page 2
Page 3    Page 4
Page 5    Page 6
Page 7    Page 8

 


1952 BBMA Little League Group Photo

<Historical Facts> <> <Brookline History>