Saw Mill Run Boulevard - State Route 51

Saw Mill Run Boulevard at Provost Road in 1964.
Saw Mill Run Boulevard at Stewart Avenue. This is the official southern end of the Boulevard.

Click on images for larger photos

Saw Mill Run Boulevard runs along the Saw Mill Run Corridor, following the path of Saw Mill Run Creek. It begins at the intersection of Clairton Road and Stewart Avenue on the City of Pittsburgh boundary with Brentwood.

The roadway runs north through Overbrook and forms the eastern border of Brookline. It passes the Liberty Tunnel/West Liberty Avenue and the Fort Pitt Tunnel/Parkway West interchanges. It ends at the West End Circle near the entrance to the West End Bridge.

A four-lane road its entire length, the northernmost section, known as the West End Bypass, is designated an expressway. The Bypass runs from the Parkway West interchange to the West End Circle. The entire roadway is part of State Route 51 and US Route 19.


Saw Mill Run At The Turn-Of-The-Century

In the early 1900s Saw Mill Run was no more than a dirt path leading south along Saw Mill Run Creek from the intersection of West Liberty Avenue and Warrington Avenue. The township road, called the Warrington Avenue extension or Kaiser Avenue, ran to a point near Edgebrook Avenue. When World War I began, the name Kaiser Avenue was replaced with Saw Mill Run Road

At Edgebrook Avenue began a patchwork of residential streets in the old town of Reflectorville. After passing through the village to Nobles Lane, the Library Road Extension carried travelers through to the town of Fairhaven and the Library Road intersection.

The intersection of Saw Mill Run and
Library Road in 1909.
The intersection of Saw Mill Run (Library Road Extension) and Library Road, shown in 1909.


Rapid Development Of The South Hills

As development of Pittsburgh's southern neighborhoods and nearby suburbs began in earnest, the need for a better roadway became a necessity. With the construction of the Liberty Tunnels underway in 1920, the transformation of the Saw Mill Run Valley began.

Saw Mill Run from Bausman Street
heading east towards Overbrook in 1909.    Saw Mill Run from near West Liberty
Avenue to Bausman Street in 1917.
Saw Mill Run from Bausman Street heading east towards Overbrook (Fairhaven) in 1909 (left) and
Saw Mill Run in 1917 showing homes from near West Liberty Avenue to Bausman Street.

The project would take another twelve years to complete, but by 1932 there would be a four-lane highway stretching from the Stewart Avenue in Overbrook all the way to the Banksville Traffic Circle. Further road construction in the 1950s took the boulevard from the Traffic Circle to the West End and West Carson Street. The purpose of this photo narrative is to describe that process in detail.

Warrington Avenue looking towards the West
Liberty Avenue intersection in October 1919.
Warrington Avenue, looking towards the junction with West Liberty Avenue and Saw Mill Run Road on October 7, 1919.


Preparations For A Modern Roadway Begin In 1925

In anticipation of the construction of a major roadway through the Saw Mill Run Valley, and the urgencies created by the rapid residential and commercial development of the nearby area, construction of a forty-two inch sewer line from the West Liberty Avenue extension to Bausman Street and along the Saw Mill Run Valley to Warrington Avenue began in June 1925. The modern sewer line and other infrastructure improvements laid the groundwork for future construction.

Saw Mill Run Road at the
intersection of West Liberty Avenue - 1925    Saw Mill Run Road near the
intersection with West Liberty Avenue - 1925
Modern sewer lines were laid along Saw Mill Run Road (Warrington) from the intersection of
West Liberty Avenue to Bausman Street and beyond in June 1925.

Saw Mill Run Road at the
intersection of West Liberty Avenue - 1925
Laying new sewer lines at the corner of West Liberty Avenue and Saw Mill Run (Warrington) in June 1925.

Staging area for sewer construction
along Saw Mill Run Road - 1925    Staging area for sewer construction
along Saw Mill Run Road - 1925
The Kund and Eiben Manufacturing Company had a manufacturing and staging area near the lower end of Bausman Street
where the forty-two inch concrete sewer pipe sections were stored, shown here on June 25, 1925. The sections
of pipe were delivered by the nearby railroad and lowered to the staging area on a small incline.


"City Beautiful" Bond Issue - 1928

Saw Mill Run Boulevard was created as part of the 1928 Allegheny County "City Beautiful" bond issue. The bonds resulted in the creation of Saw Mill Run, Ohio River, Allegheny River and Mosside Boulevards. After the completion of the Liberty Tunnels in 1924, the city of Pittsburgh became easily accessible to the South Hills area.

As the southern communities grew, county and city planners looked for a roadway that would connect eight important throughway and improved roads (Library Road, Nobles Lane, West Liberty Avenue, Banksville Road, Washington Pike, Noblestown Road, Steubenville Pike and Carson Street.) It was also viewed as a way to bring the cities of McKeesport, Clairton and Duquesne closer to Pittsburgh.


Construction - The Library Road Extension - 1929/1930

Phase One

Construction began quickly. The first phase of construction would be the section that ran from the Library Road Extension to Reflectorville, then on towards through Warrington Avenue extension that ran past the Liberty Tunnels to Warrington Avenue proper in Beltzhoover. Many engineering challenges laid along the chosen path.

Overbrook in 1895, from Glenbury Street    Intersection with Glenbury Street - 1930.
Left - The Library Road intersection, looking from Glenbury Street in 1895; Right - Glenbury intersection in 1930.

One major engineering design challenge was the intersection at Library Road (Route 88). This heavily traveled interchange lay in the heart of Overbrook Borough, seven individual roads all converged on one location. In addition to the roads, there was the confluence of the Clairton Run Creek and the Saw Mill Run Creek, through both of which flowed a substantion amount of water.

Library Road, Ivyglen Street, Hillview Avenue, Stewart Avenue, and Glenbury Street all had to be merged with Saw Mill Run Boulevard. The resulting interchange consisted of a concealed system of five bridges with tunnels to channel the water.

Saw Mill Run/Library Road construction - 1929.    Saw Mill Run/Library Road construction - 1929.
Construction of the Saw Mill Run/Library Road interchange in 1929.

Saw Mill Run/Library Road construction - 1929.    Saw Mill Run/Library Road construction - 1929.
Construction of the Saw Mill Run/Library Road interchange in 1929.

Another engineering difficult was overcoming the multiple road network near the Whited Street (Oak Street) intersection. This would require a complete reconfiguration and reconstruction, as there was no single intersection or actual through road at this point, just a merging of several different streets.

Home at 1700 Saw Mill Run Boulevard
at the corner with Whited Street.
This home stood at the bottom of Whited Street. The boulevard would pass directly in front of the home.
Rather than excavate the hillside behind the home and move it to the rear, the owners chose to remove
the front porch to make space for the roadway to pass. Shortly after construction was complete, the
home, then addressed as 1700 Saw Mill Run Boulevard, became part of an Amoco service station.

1922 Map showing intersection at the bottom
of Whited Street, then called Oak Street.
1922 map showing the road network at the bottom of Whited Street, then called Oak Street.

Engineers designed the layout of the boulevard to follow the existing Library Road Extension from Route 88 to Whited Street, then follow Second Avenue through Reflectorville (Overbrook) to near Edgebrook Avenue. The roadway would then veer towards Ensign Avenue and proceed for a short distance. From there a path was cut until the boulevard merged with the existing Warrington Avenue extension.

Saw Mill Run and Nobles Lane - 1929.    Saw Mill Run Boulevard Construction - 1929.
Saw Mill Run Boulevard at the Nobles Lane intersection, near Whited Street, before paving (left) and Second Avenue
homes that stand along the route of the proposed new boulevard. Those on the right will be razed.

Second Avenue homes - 1929
A small guage rail line was laid along Second Avenue to transport construction materials and concrete for construction.

Edgebrook Avenue on April 30, 1929.    A parking area at Bausman Street
Edgebrook Avenue on April 30, 1929. The new boulevard will pass by between these two homes where the shed
stands (left) and a parking area at Bausman street with a small guage rail line used
for hauling construction debris for McKinley Park fill.

Saw Mill Run Boulevard at Edgebrook Avenue - 1929.    Mixing Center at Edgebrook Avenue - 1929.
Loads of aggregate were dumped directly from
rail cars and cement was mixed on the spot.
Saw Mill Run at Edgebrook Avenue in 1929 (left) and the cement mixer at the Edgebrook railroad location. Aggregate was
dumped directly from rail cars into the mixer. The product was then transported via small-gauge rail where needed.

Saw Mill Run approaching the intersection
with West Liberty Avenue and the Liberty Tunnel.
Saw Mill Run on April 30, 1929, approaching the intersectionwith West Liberty Avenue and the Liberty Tunnel.

After nearly a year of hard work, the first phase in the construction of Saw Mill Run Boulevard was completed on December 1, 1929. To the delight of many residents of Overbrook, Carrick, Whitehall and Brookline, the new highway was a significant improvement for motorists and helped spur further development in their districts, both residential and commercial.

Prior to the grand opening, City Planners considered changing the name of the roadway from Saw Mill Run Boulevard to Liberty Boulevard, but this proposal never gained momentum. So, in the Spring of 1930 a special dedication and parade was held signaling the official opening of Saw Mill Run Boulevard.

The intersection at Whited Street in January 1930    Approaching Edgebrook Avenue in January 1930
The newly finished Saw Mill Run Boulevard at the intersection with Whited Street (left)
and approaching the intersection with Edgebrook Avenue on January 7, 1930.

1930 parade in Ovebrook dedicating the
completion of the first phase of the
construction of Saw Mill Run Boulevard.
The Spring 1930 dedication parade began in Overbrook, celebrating the completion
of the initial phase of the Saw Mill Run Boulevard project.


Construction - Warrington To Woodruff - 1930

Phase Two

During the next phase of construction, the boulevard was extended from Warrington Avenue to Woodruff Street. Some of the necessary infrastructure work had been going on for months during the First Phase of construction and, in the case of the sewer line, since 1925. This enabled the Second Phase of construction to be completed in the late-Summer of 1930.

With the exception of a dirt pathway from Warrington Avenue to Crane Avenue, this was all new roadway. The major challenges were creating a cut through the rocky hillside between Crane Avenue and Woodruff Street, and the construction of a new portal bridge over which ran the freight trains of the Wabash Terminal Railway from it's hub in downtown Pittsburgh. This second stretch of roadway opened on September 9, 1930.

From its' terminus at Woodruff Street, inbound motorists either turned right and headed up narrow Woodruff and over Mount Washington to McArdle Roadway, or they turned right and followed the paved Pittsburgh Railways streetcar line to Woodville Avenue and on towards the West End and West Carson Street. With the pending improvements to Banksville Road and other transportation initiatives looming in the near future, these were a short-lived alternatives.

Surveying near the Crane Avenue bridge in June 1929.    Surveying the route between Crane Avenue
and Woodruff Street in June 1929.
Surveying near the Crane Avenue bridge and along the approach to Woodruff Street on June 10, 1929

Approaching the railroad overpass at Woodruff Street on April 22, 1930
A look at the large cut made in the hillside approaching the Woodruff Street railroad overpass on April 22, 1930.

Approaching the railroad overpass at Woodruff Street on July 17, 1930    Approaching the railroad overpass at Woodruff Street on September 8, 1930
Approaching the railroad overpass at Woodruff Street on July 17, 1930 (left) and on September 8, 1930.

The procession on the Dedication
 Day for the completion of the second phase of the
Saw Mill Run Boulevard construction on September 9, 1930.
The procession on Dedication Day - September 9, 1930 for the completion of the second phase of construction.

The Woodruff Street terminus for
the new Saw Mill Run Boulevard on
Dedication Day - September 9, 1930.
The Woodruff Street terminus for the new Saw Mill Run Boulevard on Dedication Day - September 9, 1930. From this
point inbound motorists followed the street car line to Woodville Avenue and on the West End and Carson Street.
They could also turn right and head up Woodruff and over Mount Washington to McArdle Roadway.

* Thanks to Tim Killmeyer for many of the Phase One and Phase Two images *


The Banksville Traffic Circle - 1932

With the rapid development of the South Hills area, it was apparent from the start of the Saw Mill Run project that it was necessary for the boulevard to connect with Banksville Road and Woodville Avenue. This would facilitate traffic to the West End and fit in with some long range plans that had been sitting idle for several years.

In 1932 Saw Mill Run Boulevard was extended
from Woodruff Street to the Banksville Circle.
In 1932 Saw Mill Run Boulevard was extended from Woodruff Street to the Banksville Traffic Circle.

This led to the creation of the Banksville Traffic Circle, a large looping turn-around at the end of Banksville Road that connected with Saw Mill Run Boulevard and Woodville Avenue. Construction of the circle was completed in 1932 and it provided some relief with the traffic flow on the southern side of Mount Washington.

The Banksville Traffic Circle in August 1932    The Banksville Traffic Circle in July 1937
The Banksville Traffic Circle, looking from Banksville Road towards Saw Mill Run Boulevard, in 1932 (left) and 1937.

Another improvement that followed was the Woodruff and Merrimac Street Improvement project in 1934. Both Woodruff and Merrimac were widened to four lanes to help provide another reliable route for the ever-increasing amount of vehicular traffic from the South Hills to downtown Pittsburgh.

Saw Mill Run at the Banksville Circle in
1949. This was the end of the Boulevard until the
construction of the West End Bypass in 1950.
The Banksville Traffic Circle, once the northernmost part of Saw Mill Run Boulevard, in 1949. Visible to the left
is Woodville Avenue. In the lower left would be Banksville Road and to the right Saw Mill Run Boulevard.


Improvement Plans - What Might Have Been - 1934

The next step in the improvement of the South Hills transportation network was something that had been in the minds of planners since the 1910s, when planning for the Liberty Tunnels was underway. These plans included the improvement of Banksville Road to a four-lane boulevard and the construction of another South Hills tunnel and bridge to downtown.

The Fort Duquesne Tunnels and Bridge was under serious consideration in 1934. The $8,000,000 project would start at the Banksville Traffic Circle and include Twin Tubes, 3,750 feet in length, and a bridge over the Monongahela River that connected to Water Street, Liberty Avenue and the existing Point and Manchester Bridges.

The Fort Duquesne Tunnels and Bridge
as shown here in a 1934 drawing were one alternative
to relieve traffic congestion in the South Hills.
The Fort Duquesne Tunnels and Bridge, as shown here in a 1934 artist's rendering
were one alternative to relieve traffic congestion from the South Hills to downtown.

Funding for these two projects, along with the Woodruff Street improvement, were to come from a mixture of federal Works Project Administration dollars and imposing tolls on motorists passing through both the Liberty Tunnels and, when complete, the Fort Duquesne Tunnels. After much debate, these plans were eventually scrapped. Woodruff Street and Banksville Road were improved with federal funding, but the tunnel and bridge project were shelved.


Construction - The West End Bypass - 1949/1951

Phase Three

The reconstruction of Banksville Road in 1938 was the last in the long series of South Hills traffic improvements for ten years. During this time, the City of Pittsburgh hired famed planner Robert Moses to design a far reaching transportation initiative that would solve Pittsburgh's traffic nightmares for years to come.

In 1939, he submitted the extensive "Moses Plan", which, if implemented in it's entirety, would finally bring Pittsburgh into sync with the ever-expanding age of the automobile. In the South Hills area. this plan included construction of the Saw Mill Run Extension, better known as the West End Bypass, the Parkway West and the Fort Pitt Tunnels and Bridge.

West End Bypass excavation work.
PG Photo - November 7, 1949.
Post-Gazette image November 7, 1949 showing the excavation of the hillside along the route of the bypass.

Construction of the West End Bypass began in October 1949. The modern four-lane expressway, a little over a mile in length, would extend along the Mount Washington hillside from the Banksville Traffic Circle to West Carson Street. The biggest engineering challenge was the extensive excavation of the hillside to accomodate the roadway.

The Banksville Circle in 1949.
The Banksville Traffic Circle, shown here in 1949, during initial phases of the West End Bypass construction.

It took over a year of blasting to remove the one million cubic yards of rubble needed to accomplish the task. Trucks carried away the mountains of soil, 5000 cubic yards a day, in convoys to locations along Greentree Road and near Langley High School to make land for athletic fields.

The Banksville Circle in 1950 showing
the beginning phases of the construction of
the West End Bypass which extended Saw Mill
Run Blvd to Carson Street.
The Banksville Traffic Circle, shown here during construction of the West End Bypass in 1950.

Another challenge for the contractor, Harrison Construction Company, was the creation of a long ramp from Steuben Street to link outbound motorists with the new expressway. When the project was completed in the Spring of 1951, South Hills motorists could now zoom from the Traffic Circle to Carson Street without having to pass through the West End Business District. What once took up to one half hour or more now was a matter of a few minutes or less.

The West End Bypass - 1951.
An aerial view of the West End Bypass in 1951, showing the full extent of the Mount Washington excavation.


Construction - The Fort Pitt Tunnel Interchange - 1952/1957

Phase Four

The final piece of the Saw Mill Run Boulevard construction project occured between 1952 and 1957. This entailed the removal of the Banksville Traffic Circle and replacing it with a modern interchange that would connect Saw Mill Run Boulevard, the West End Bypass, Banksville Road and Woodville Avenue with the soon-to-be-constructed Fort Pitt Tunnels, Fort Pitt Bridge and Parkway West (I279).

Aside from the challenge of building the multi-ramp interchange, engineers faced with another extensive hillside excavation in order to make the necessary room for the tunnel entrance and the interchange. The West End Bypass began a three-month closure in May 1952 and the task of removing the mountain of rock began.

Excavation of a large chunk of Mount Washington
hillside was necessary for completion of
the Fort Pitt Tunnel Interchange - 1952.
Excavation of another large chunk of Mount Washington hillside, shown here in 1952, was necessary
for completion of the Parkway West and Fort Pitt Tunnel Interchange.

Aside from the excavation of 710,000 cubic yards of earth and rock from the 259-foot hillside, the $4.5 million project required relocation of two railroad bridge and the replacing of sewage facilities. Then, of course the construction of the highway, tunnels and accompanying bridge over the Monongahela River, which was following the same general path of the Fort Duquesne plan from 1934.

The fill from the hillside went to fill the valley for the section of the Parkway West known as Greentree Hill. The Traffic Circle was removed and a temporary restricted roadway was built to link Saw Mill Run with the West End Bypass. The remainder of the interchange project took five more years to complete. By 1957 Saw Mill Run Boulevard was complete.

The new interchange at the Fort Pitt Tunnels
eliminated the old Banksville Circle and helped
extend the Saw Mill Run Blvd to Carson Street.
The Fort Pitt Tunnel interchange in 1957. Saw Mill Run Boulevard was now complete from Overbrook to the West End.

It was a further three years before the Parkway West, Fort Pitt Tunnels and Fort Pitt Bridge were all linked together with Saw Mill Run Boulevard. Never-the-less, the twenty-eight year Saw Mill Run Boulevard and West End Expressway projects were instrumental components in modernizing the road network of the South Hills to meet the transportation needs of the future. Their completion meant that, transportation-wise, Pittsburgh had truly entered the twentieth century.


Liberty Tunnels South Interchange - 1998/1999

After sixty years of service, Saw Mill Run Boulevard began to see improvements made during the 1990s and 2000s. In the early 1990s median barriers were installed from Whited Street north to the Parkway West interchange. In 1998 work began on a new traffic design where Saw Mill Run meets West Liberty Avenue and the Liberty Tunnels.

The heavily-traveled interchange, which handles over 100,000 vehicles per day, had been a bottleneck for years. Plans were in place in 1957 for a design change, but they were never put into action. Finally, in 1999, the new interchange was completed and has been hailed as a major improvement by almost everyone who lives in the South Hills.

The Liberty Tunnels South Portal Interchange - 1999.


The West End Circle Interchange - 2005/2010

Construction of a new traffic design pattern at the equally-crowded Northern Terminus of Saw Mill Run Boulevard, approaching Carson Street and the West End Bridge, began in the mid-2000s. An additional lane was added to the highway and the hillside was stabilized.

The intersection at the West End Circle was redesigned, with the construction of a third tunnel to allow a more coordinated traffic flow. The project was completed in 2010. The new interchange was welcomed by motorists as another major improvement.

The West End interchange in 1951 prior to
the opening of the Saw Mill Run Extension.    The new West End Circle traffic design where
Saw Mill Run Boulevard meets Carson Street.
Left - The Saw Mill Run Extension approaching the West End Interchange prior to opening in 1951;
Right - The new traffic design pattern at the Northern Terminus of Saw Mill Run Boulevard.


The Route51/Route 88 Interchange - 2013/2015

The next improvement was made at the southern edge of the Boulevard, where a complete rehabilitation of the overcrowded Library Road (State Route 88) intersection took place from 2013 through the fall of 2015. The heavily traveled interchange had become a serious chokepoint for traffic and a dangerous safety concern.

In the works since the late 1990s, initial improvement plans favored a design similar to the interchange at the Liberty Tunnels. However, after over a decade of deliberation and delays, new plans were introduced in October of 2010, approving a jughandle design.

The interchange at Saw Mill Run
Boulevard and Library Road in 2010.    Glenbury Street approaching the intersection
of Saw Mill Run and Library Road, 2010.
The five-way Route 51/Route 88 intersection looking south along Saw Mill Run Boulevard (left) and Glenbury Street
approaching the Rt 51/Rt 88 intersection. Both pictures were taken prior to the reconstruction.

Design for the new Route 51/Route 88 exchange,
introduced by PennDot in October, 2010.
The design plans for the new Route 51/Route 88 interchange.

Rt51/Rt88 interchange - March 16, 2015
A sea of signs stand at the approaches to the intersection during reconstruction on March 16, 2015.

Construction of the new interchange began in late-2013. Over the next several months, severan decaying bridges along the construction path were rebuilt. Utilities and traffic signals were improved. The roadway was completely rebuilt. At a cost of over $20 million, the construction project was completed in November 2015. South Hills motorists cheered the new interchange, which dramatically improved the flow of traffic at this major intersection.

Rt51/Rt88 interchange in 2017
A new Route 51/Route 88 interchange as seen from above in 2017.


Further Improvements - 2017/present

Finally, in 2017, PennDot contracted Gulisek Construction to perform a $4.32 million improvement project on the Liberty Tunnels South Interchange. The project ran from March to July, and included concrete patching, an asphalt overlay, bridge preservation, drainage improvements, ADA curb cut ramp installation, signage and signal upgrades, ramp reconstruction, and other miscellaneous construction activities.




Photos of Locations Along Saw Mill Run Boulevard

The Horning Farm in 1895. This is the
site of present-day St. Norbert Church.
The Horning Farm, where the present-day St. Norbert Church is located, shown in 1895.
Today, this is the location of the Route51/Route 88 interchange.

 

Saw Mill Run Boulevard at Maytide Street - 1929.    Saw Mill Run at Maytide Street - 1929.
Left - Saw Mill Run at Maytide Street after paving (left) and a section further north prior to resurfacing in 1929.

 

Bakey's Auto Service - 1930.    The Bakey Residence at the corner
of St. Norbert Street - 1930.
Bakey's Auto Service (left) at Maytide Street and the Bakey home on the corner of St. Norbert Street in 1930.

 

Butler Grocers at the corner of Glenbury Street - 1930.    Saw Mill Run and Whited Street - 1930.
The A&P grocery store (left) near Glenbury Street and the intersection with Whited Street (right) in 1930.

 

The Overbrook business district - 1934.    The Overbrook Market on Saw Mill Run Boulevard - 1934.
The Overbrook fire house (left) across from Maytide Street and the Overbrook Market in 1934.

 

The Saw Mill Run Garage - 1934.    Overbrook School - 1934.
The Saw Mill Run Garage (left) and Overbrook School in 1934.

 

The Overbrook Business District - 1936.    The Overbrook Business District - 1936.
Saw Mill Run Boulevard looking south through the Overbrook business district towards Library Road in 1936.

 

Saw Mill Run Boulevard and Nobles Lane - 1936.    Saw Mill Run Boulevard near Whited Street - 1938.
Saw Mill Run Boulevard near the intersection with Whited Street and Nobles Lane in 1936 (left) and 1938 (right).

 

Saw Mill Run Boulevard near Nobles Lane - 1934.    Saw Mill Run Boulevard near West Liberty Avenue - 1938.
Left - The Oak Viaduct at the intersection with Whited Street and Nobles Lane in 1934; Right - Saw Mill Run
approaching the West Liberty Avenue/Liberty Bridge intersection, taken from Warrington Avenue in 1938.

 

The original Eat 'n Park Restaurant - 1949
The original Eat'n Park restaurant, located at 2209 Saw Mill Run Boulevard, opened in 1949.

 

Barton's Garage on Saw Mill Run Blvd - 1934.    Fred's Auto Sales - 1949.
Barton's Garage (left) in 1934 and Fred's Auto Sales in 1949.

 

Al Schwartz Used Cars - 1950.    Powers Motor Sales - 1950.
Al Schwartz sold the finest used cars in town, and Powers Motor Sales advertised a Safe Buy in 1950.

 

Saw Mill Run Boulevard at the intersection with West
Liberty Avenue and the Liberty Tunnels - 1948.
Saw Mill Run Boulevard (flowing left-right) at the junction with West Liberty Avenue and the Liberty Tunnels in 1948.

 

Bausman Avenue looking towards Kaiser Avenue
(Saw Mill Run). Brookline is on the far side of the road.    Looking up Bausman Avenue from Saw Mill Run Road (Kaiser Avenue).
At Bausman Avenue, 1909, looking towards McKinley Park (left) and towards Kaiser Avenue (right). Saw Mill Run was
called Kaiser Avenue at the turn of the century. Brookline begins on the far side of the road in the righthand photo.

 

Castle Shannon Railroad Bridge at Bausman Street.    The Oak Viaduct at Nobles Lane near Whited Street.
The McKinley Bridge at Bausman Street (left) and the Reflectorville Viaduct at Edgebrook Avenue.

 

Bausman Street Bridge.    The Oak Viaduct at Nobles Lane near Whited Street.
The wooden McKinley Bridge at Bausman Street was replaced with a steel structure in 1929. The Oak Viaduct was renovated
that same year. Both were used by the Port Authority until 1993 and have since been replaced with modern structures.

 

For More Pictures Of Saw Mill Run Boulevard
And The Valley Over The Past Century:

Random Images Of Saw Mill Run

 

Overbrook School in 1960.
Overbrook Elementary School in 1960. Once known as Overbrook Central, the school was built in 1928 and closed in 2003.
The school is being renovated into a Senior Citizen assisted-living apartment complex.

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